Locally Owned and Family Operated Funeral Homes

As the population ages a growing number of American funeral homes are being purchased by out-of-town entities.  Often these entities are large corporations. In other instances, they are being purchased by capital venture investors. We believe there is an advantage to using a locally-owned, family-operated funeral home. Generally speaking, corporate-owned funeral homes are more expensive.…

Read More

Appointing a Personal Funeral Representative

Many people think that a Power of Attorney can authorize a cremation in the State of Michigan.  Michigan law requires a majority of relatives of equal kinship to authorize a cremation. Sometimes it is difficult to find these individuals. And sometimes due to family dynamics, they cannot agree on the method of disposition.  In the…

Read More

What Happens After Cremation?

Many people think that cremation is the final thing they need to do when a death occurs.  However, something needs to be done with the cremated remains after the cremation has taken place. Here are some options for you to consider: BURIAL – Cremated remains may be interred in any cemetery.  Some cemeteries have specific…

Read More

One of Our Competitors has Sold

One of our competitors has sold to an out-of-town corporation. We believe that members of our community prefer to work with people they know, in businesses in which their money helps build the local economy.  We also believe that locally and family-owned funeral homes are superior in the manner in which they render service. The…

Read More

Writing A Thank You Note

When someone dies, friends and neighbors often express their sympathy to the surviving family by sending flowers, providing food to the family or making a contribution in memory of the deceased to a charitable organization which has been named by the family. There are countless other ways people express sympathy and assist a family in…

Read More

Where Do Your Cremations Take Place?

In the State of Michigan, it is illegal for funeral homes to own and operate a crematory. This prohibition is due to the anti-combo law which forbids funeral homes, cemeteries and crematories, from being owned by the same entity in any given market.  Some funeral homes circumvent this law, by putting the ownership of the…

Read More

What to Do When a Death Occurs

The Bible tells us that death comes “like a thief in the night.” In other words, we never know when someone is going to die.  Survivors are caught off-guard and often don’t know what to do. If the death occurs in a hospital, nursing home or other health care facility, the nursing staff will assist…

Read More

Obituary Notices

Obituaries are notices placed by surviving family members to advise other family members and friends of a death. Historically, these notices have been placed in the newspaper.  In more recent years, obituary notices have been appearing online and funeral home websites.  Obituaries not only announce a death but they also give tribute to a person’s…

Read More

Death Certificates

In the State of Michigan, it is the funeral director’s responsibility is to ascertain that the death certificate is properly filed with the county clerk in which the death has occurred. The funeral director gleans the information needed for the death certificate from the family. This information includes the legal full name of the deceased,…

Read More

Authorizing a Cremation

Michigan law requires that a cremation must be authorized by a legal next of kin. Generally, the next of kin is easily identifiable.  The next of kin is the surviving person or persons listed in the following order: 1) Spouse; 2) Children; 3) Grandchildren and thereafter the issue of; 4) parents; 5) Siblings; 6) Nieces…

Read More